Ryvita Limbos

matilda - 11:30 02 October 2008

I find this ad just a little bit patronising for my liking ..is this another attenpt to demonise the plain traditonal potatoe crisp - surely in moderation crisps as treats are good for you!!!

matilda - 11:32 02 October 2008

ps ....this has nothing to do with the ad itself but rather this new type of product

Christian - 15:03 02 October 2008

Technically, crisps are not good for you. Just like Coke pluss (contains vitamins). I understand how Matilda can find it patronising but I think the target audience will understand that its not meant to be and focus on the core of message itself, you can have crisps and be healthy (although it introduces a brilliant paradox) but, as with the coca cola advert, I think people are ready to accept anything as long as it gives them a reason to not feel as bad for having a treat. The other thing is they have cleverly tied it in with the green outdoors and a sporting activity wich might tap into the unconsiousness and create a stringer healthy feeling.

matilda - 15:31 02 October 2008

But I am mother of two toddlers, Christian. So that's why I thought it was patronising, the media, celebrities are as I said, demonising snacks. My son for example has them as the rare treat, so if they are the rare treat why should I give this stuff to eat? I can imagine it doesn't taste as good and the regular crisps and this is probably the reason why the message revolves around health and not taste!

Mike - 15:34 02 October 2008

I did find it a tad dull. Yes, all the expected semiotics ae there: healthy, green, etc. Yes it gives permission to eat chrisps and yes it jumps on the healthy eating bandwagon. But the ad is also no more than a product description and teh product (as has already been noted) is just like every other low-fat snack intridcted in the last couple of years.

Christian - 16:54 02 October 2008

I was not aware that this was a celebraty. but are people more worried about the flavour vs the health? I personally cant really tell the difference in quality of flavour in the crisps and I take for granted that they taste good so a healthier crisp would appeal to me making me think its not that "unhealthy" but I guess it does maybe fall for the old "dont say your interested, show that you are interested" lesson and making the message to obvious.

Holly - 11:31 08 October 2008

I understand the spokesperson, the play on health, the sports day, all the generic themes used here to appeal to the stereotypical healthy eater, but as an advert I think they've missed one crucial thing - at no point do you actually see the product properly. You see the packet, you see her eating one, but I have no idea if I would want to do the same if I can't see a quick close up of the thing!

richard - 09:20 17 October 2008

do if its food - might that be important for many mothers - i want to see what my son is putting in his mouth....good point holly

Christian - 17:55 26 November 2008

I do think that as a launch this is a good ad, because the message is simple. they display the packet big so we can recognise it and as Mike points out uses the semiology to give it a healthy feel and the 'limboing' under the finish line (although a little sad) reinforces the brand name. The spokesperson is used to get attention from trusted fans and all together I would say a rather good launch

Louise - 18:06 26 November 2008

Apart from the celebrity endorsement of Fern Britton being in the ad, i would have said it was a low budget advert which didn't particularly catch my attention. I understand the concept of a healthy day of sport and limbos winning thr race, but i think the brand could have executed it better. It just didn't stand out very well. Also if i hadn't tried the product myself i would say as a consumer looking at the packaging that they are very similar to Wotsits?!

Maja - 18:28 26 November 2008

The advert itself is simple, but it brings out the main points Limbos stands for and what they want people to know. It also illustrates the fact that Limbos are a lot healthier and doesn't give you the "being unhealthy and unfit" feeling in a funny way with the crisp bags being slow runners. They look like dull potato bags which you would associate with as heavy. I think the advert is alright, however a bit annoying with the lady and personally I think it is a bit weird having people standing by the side as well as they are looking at running crisp bags, it's unrealistic! I wouldn't say it is very appealing to the target market considering they are busy housewifes you would rather reflect on something more appealing to their interests, not imaginative running crisp bags!

Lauren C - 14:03 27 November 2008

When I first saw this advert I actuslly laughed I found it quite funny seeing a running crisp packet... maybe that is just my sad sense of humour. However, I also agree with Holly's comment, the only time I want to buy the food I see in advertisements is when I can see it, as the sight of the product makes me hungry. Therefore, if the actual crisps are not displayed how are consumers meant to long for the crisps in order to buy them when they visit the shops?

Isobel - 15:08 28 November 2008

Ryvita have a good product, and although the ad successfully communicates the product benefits to the viewer (low in fat etc), it doesn't really tell us what Limbos actually are. I guess it could be argued that this was the intention, and the ad was supposed to create intrigue and thus stimulate trial, however I'm not so sure it was a great idea. The ad implies that Limbos are like regular crisps, but it is only after sampling the product myself that I realised they are nothing like crisps at all!

Hannah Jones - 20:09 29 November 2008

I understand what they have tried to do it in this advert with the communication objective to promote the healthy snacks and how much lower in fat they are in comparison to competitors, yet this market is heavily saturated with other adverts also playing on the healthy vibes. Furthermore, I think society will always be cynical about such adverts, consumers are meant to be savvier and yet this advert is selling crisps on a 'healthy' premise: all consumers hear is about the necessity to be healthy and I think crisps and health conscious eating in an advert is a contradiction. The semiotics work well in terms of connotating the healthy and green message. In terms of the target audience mothers may buy these for their families but after tasting them I would definitely say these are more of an adult snack. Moreover, if these crisps were to be given as a 'treat' to children I would rather give them a real treat and allow them a normal packet of crisps as I personally feel it is everything in moderation and a treat should be a 'real' treat. In conclusion, I think the creative message could have been more innovative here to cut through the clutter of the market.

Hannah Jones - 20:09 29 November 2008

I understand what they have tried to do it in this advert with the communication objective to promote the healthy snacks and how much lower in fat they are in comparison to competitors, yet this market is heavily saturated with other adverts also playing on the healthy vibes. Furthermore, I think society will always be cynical about such adverts, consumers are meant to be savvier and yet this advert is selling crisps on a 'healthy' premise: all consumers hear is about the necessity to be healthy and I think crisps and health conscious eating in an advert is a contradiction. The semiotics work well in terms of connotating the healthy and green message. In terms of the target audience mothers may buy these for their families but after tasting them I would definitely say these are more of an adult snack. Moreover, if these crisps were to be given as a 'treat' to children I would rather give them a real treat and allow them a normal packet of crisps as I personally feel it is everything in moderation and a treat should be a 'real' treat. In conclusion, I think the creative message could have been more innovative here to cut through the clutter of the market.

Dave Ellis - 02:51 01 December 2008

I am not convinced either that this advert has the strength to cut through the constant clutter of adverts trying to sell consumers something that is low in fat, healthly, nutriential and so on. The use of Fern Brittan however is apporiopiate as it lends synergy with the Ryvita brand, which she is well known for endorsing. Although the advert does clearly express the USP of the product (lower fat than regular crisps), I think more thought could have gone into the creative execution of the advert, to make it stand out and to appeal more to the family market (a point mentioned by the client in the lecture). Perhaps a family around the house eating limbos who have illustrated this point more fully).

Layan - 09:17 04 December 2008

I think the ad seems a bit too confusing. The ad suggests that regular crisps are bad and Ryvita Limbo is good and healthy. Moreover, Fern Brittan informs the consumer that in comes in all our favourite flavours. Doesn't that mean that it is full of E numbers? I agree with Davis this ad does not have the strength to stand out and sell consumers something that is low in fat.

rosie - 08:33 18 December 2008

why all this interest in a pack of rather odd tasting crisps? walkers have lttle to fear from this rather twee effort...

bb - 08:34 18 December 2008

ummmmmmmmmmm so is it the product or the advertising that is the real issue here????

nicole - 13:18 11 February 2010

This advert is trying to make 'healthy' options look fun and appealing to the target audience; most likely appealing to young women, but also women in general who are into 'healthy' living and dieting. The use of the race and runnig commentary emphasises the fact that these crisps are the best and nothing compares, which could be entising, but at the end of the day, they're marketing the product as a 'healthy' best...when they're still rubbish.

Zara Murji - 14:23 11 February 2010

The advert tries to play on the name of the product 'Limbo' through the generation of humour, however I think the humour used is very lazy and not at all witty. Fern Britton is a trustworthy, authorative figure in UK showbusiness, so it is understandable to why she is the spokesperson- she has also been the face of Ryvita so this complies with recognisability and association of the product. The USP being '90% low in fat' is emphasised and the information delivered that they are baked rather than fried is good. I feel this advert is weak, as the target audience is not made completely clear although it is mothers, the humour fails to be clever and it doesn't draw any intrigue or interest in the product.

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